Elite Home Visits: Bringing the Clinic Experience Home

home visits

Elite Home Visits

Elite Integrated Therapy Centers offers physical, occupational and speech therapy services in the home and in assisted-living facility settings. Our home visits are offered to anyone in the Upstate area with no restrictions or extra costs. It is billed exactly as if you are in the clinic with us, and there are no guidelines that need to be met to qualify for in-home treatment. This program also serves as an effective home health discharge plan reducing re-hospitalization/readmission rates for vulnerable patient populations.

Who Qualifies for Elite Home Visits?

Anyone and everyone! There are no limitations on who can receive these services. In contrast to home health, we bill Medicare Part B rather than Part A. Therefore, there are no additional fees or qualifications. Your copay will be dependent upon your insurance. We will also pre-verify your benefits before your first appointment so there are no surprises.

Those Who Benefit the Most

That said, this program is more beneficial to some more than others. We strongly encourage patients to attend their therapy sessions in the clinic. However, we realize that is not feasible for everyone so we wanted to bridge that gap.

Our home visit services are ideal for those who:

  • Are immunocompromised or have a respiratory condition at this time.
  • Are home-bound.
  • Have transportation issues.
  • Reside far from healthcare facilities.

If you fall into one of these categories, Elite home visits would be a great option for your physical, occupational and/or speech therapy needs. Our goal is to help you live your best, pain-free life.

Physical Therapy vs. Occupational Therapy vs. Speech Therapy

Physical, occupational and speech therapy all mutually focus on targeted tasks and problem solving to promote success in the home environment. However, each one can then be further broken down into assisting with the following objectives:

  • Physical Therapy: functional mobility, rehabilitation, assistive device utilization and balance.
  • Occupational Therapy: activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, driving), returning to work and fall prevention.
  • Speech Therapy: speech & language, cognition (memory, problem solving, safety), feeding/swallowing, fluency and voice disorders.

Treatment methods vary dependent upon your specific needs and goals. Your doctor may refer you for one of these services. You may also call us personally to schedule your appointment – no referral necessary! We will continue to keep your primary care physician updated with your progress throughout treatment.

What to Expect

Now that you have made your appointment, what can you expect?

We provide you with a two hour window in which we will arrive at your house and will call you the day of when we are on the way. Upon arrival, we will review your insurance information, as well as some general paperwork. The first part of your evaluation will be spent discussing your medical history, symptoms and goals. Various tests will be performed to determine your functional capabilities and limitations. Your results are then used to create a unique, individualized treatment program. We will work closely alongside you, helping you achieve your goals and measuring your success along the way.

Added Bonus!

In addition to these services, our in-home speech language pathologists can also help during this time for those who have suddenly become tasked with being an at home educator, which includes special education services. Our therapists can help bridge the gap and prevent regression. We are able to work with all ages, including infants, children and adolescents.

For Your Convenience

We accept most commercial insurances, Medicaid, Medicare and offer private pay services/payment plans. We are happy to work around your schedule to find a time most convenient for you. Our goal is to assist you as best we can during this unprecedented time. Continuing progress in therapy prevents regression or worsened symptoms of pain or injury, which is why we have chosen to remain available to those who need us the most. We are continuing to treat in the clinics, as well, and going above and beyond all CDC and WHO safety guidelines.

Battling Bone Loss: Using Exercise to Combat Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

One of the most widely common problems is also one you might not even know you have – osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition that makes bones weak and brittle because new bone creation does not keep up with old bone removal. This condition that can lead to even more serious problems like falls and broken bones.  Osteoporosis mostly affects women over 41-years old (4). However, exercise is a great way to be proactive! Most of us have heard that weight-bearing exercises are effective in preventing and treating osteoporosis, but have you ever been told why? Luckily, we’re about to tell you! We are going to delve into how and why loading up the body helps rebuild bone structure.

Your Ever-changing Bones

Let’s start by talking about general bone structure. Your body is constantly stripping bone away and replacing it with new bone; similar to your skin sloughing away and regenerating new cells. The problem with osteoporosis comes when your body can’t replace bone at the same pace as it removes bone. In order to initiate new bone growth, stress that is slightly greater than the stress caused from everyday tension must be put on bones. Once this happens on a regular basis, the body allocates resources and nutrients to build bone mass in order to resist fractures (2). A regular exercise routine provides both the necessary stress to the bones and regular occurrence needed for the rebuilding process to occur.

What Kind of Exercise is Best?

Exercise is crucial because physical inactivity has been shown to decrease bone density and cause other health issues. At this point, you may be asking yourself what kind of exercise you should be doing to prevent osteoporosis. While both aerobic exercise and resistance training can provide the weight-bearing stimulation needed for bone growth, resistance training in particular is able to be more site-specific than aerobic exercise and it can target certain body parts (3). Other types of exercise are helpful to prevent osteoporosis, but a progressive loading style resistance program, one in which the weight you are lifting is increased little by little after each set, is best for stressing bones in a way that promotes bone growth.

Exercise Plans

Since we have determined what type of exercise you need to be doing, let us discuss the structure of your exercise program. Exercise structure can be changed up in order to keep things fun. For example, check out the two exercise programs below for simple sit-to-stands below:

Tip: To do a sit-to-stand, set up a chair in your home and stand up and sit down without using your hands

Option 1: [4×12] Routine. T

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 2: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 3: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.

Between rounds, add weight little by little to increase the load.

Option 2: Drop Set [5×12, 10, 8, 6, 4]

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 2: 10 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 3: 8 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 6 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 5: 4 sit-to-stands.

The key to this type of routine is to increase the weight between rounds at a greater rate than in the [4×12] routine. Since you are doing less reps you should increase the load more significantly each set.

Get Moving!

Your choice in movement is also a factor in an effective workout routine. Exercises that involve multi-joint movements have been shown to have a more significant change in bone structure than exercises that isolate one muscle or body part (2). Bending simultaneously at the hip and knee is a good way to encourage bone growth at the hip and femur. Pulling and pushing motions while bracing the core are great ways to incorporate multi-joint movements to increase bone density in the arms, spine, and shoulder structures. For spinal health, isometric (not changing muscle length) core-specific training is key and make sure to avoid core movements that require forward bending, like crunches (1).

Now that we’ve covered designing your structured movement plan, you are ready to prevent or reverse osteoporosis! These adaptations generally take about six months to see a change in bone density, but the change is initiated within the first few sessions (2). Be patient and don’t get discouraged! Come in and see one of our physical therapists for an evaluation and to talk about some more ways to safely strengthen your bones to prevent falls and increase bone density. Keep working hard and graduate to work with one of our Wellness Coordinators and progress your movements to the next level!

 

  • Bone, Muscle and Joint Team. “The Best Workouts for Osteoporosis.” Health Essentials, 2018, health.clevelandclinic.org/the-best-workouts-for-osteoporosis/.
  • French, Duncan. “Chapter 5: Adaptations to Anaerobic Training Programs.” Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, by Greg Haff and N. Travis Triplett, Human Kinetics, 2016, pp. 97–99.
  • Layne, JE, and ME Nelson. The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Bone Density: a Review.1999, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006.
  • Mayo Clinic Staff. “Osteoporosis.” Mayo Clinic, 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20351968.