Get Back in the Game

ELITE Performance, is designed to help athletes prevent injuries and confidently return back to sport after a lower extremity injury by teaching proper jumping, landing, and lifting mechanics, we work on increasing lower extremity and core strength and enhancing change-of-direction/agility techniques.

SEMI-PRIVATE TRAINING

For active individuals who are looking for more personal attention than a group class, but love working out with other people for motivation, accountability, and a sense of community.

  • Sports Performance
  • General Fitness

PERSONAL TRAINING

Training takes an individual approach towards the client’s fitness goals and is based on their health/fitness assessment.

  • General Fitness
  • Sports Performance
  • Post-Rehab Training

LOWER EXTREMITY INJURY PREVENTION/RETURN TO SPORT

Designed to help athletes, confidently/successfully, return back to sport by teaching proper jumping, landing, and lifting mechanics. We work on increasing lower extremity and core strength and enhance change of direction/agility training.

Conditions that are suitable for this program are:

  • ACL/MCL tears
  • Meniscus tears
  • Patellofemoral pain
  • Patellar tendon issues
  • IT Band Syndrome
  • Ankle Injuries

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Shin Splints
  • Hip Injuries
  • Tendonitis
  • Low Back Injuries
  • Substantial growth spurts

Team Training

Private team training packages are available for all sports, ages, and skill levels. This team training program is tailored to meet the specific needs of athletes based on sport, age, skill level, and performance goals. Team training is a great way for athletes to get an edge up on the competition by increasing sport performance levels, decreasing risk for injury, and building team camaraderie. Focuses on:

  • Strength and Conditioning geared toward increasing / enhancing strength, power, functional movement, injury prevention, and lifting mechanics
  • Speed, Agility, and Quickness Training geared toward increasing / enhancing linear and lateral speed, agility, change of direction, and injury prevention

Prices vary based on service. For inquiries, call at 864.233.5128 or e-mail us at info@elitetherapycenters.com.

Follow our ELITE Performance coaches and clients on Instagram!

Thanksgiving feast

5 Tips for Enjoying the Thanksgiving Feast

Thanksgiving feastAlthough the holidays are meant to be about family, connecting with people you care about and gratitude, the season often becomes much more about something else: food. Surviving the holiday season is no easy task! The primary focus on food around Thanksgiving can be challenging for many. Whether you stress eat or struggle to continue eating healthy when delicious foods emerge this time of year, Thanksgiving is tough! However, don’t panic and take time to enjoy the holiday. To help you survive the season, our Wellness Coordinators put together 5 tips for enjoying the Thanksgiving feast.

Something you can keep in mind: what you do on and following Thanksgiving Day will determine how quickly you recover.

Here are our 5 tips for enjoying the Thanksgiving feast:

1. Stop Being So Hard on Yourself

  • So, you ate a day and a half’s worth of calories in one sitting…? Half of America did the same! Whether it’s been five minutes since your Thanksgiving meal or it’s the day after, it is most important to get your mind right. You will not “undo” all the progress you have made up to this point in one day. Acknowledge it, accept it, and then move on. There’s enough stress already attached to the holidays, so don’t add ‘worrying about what you’re eating’ to the list. Start making better decisions immediately and remain positive!

2. Go for a Walk / Get Moving

  • Over the years, numerous studies have been published showing the benefits of walking and exercise; this data continues to remain true. Researchers have found that a post-meal walk, as short as 15 minutes, can help aid digestion and improve overall stabilization of blood sugar levels. So, get up and get moving with a family member – before OR after – your Thanksgiving meal!

3. Get Back on Track

  • The key to getting back on track is to do so immediately. This could be meeting up the next day with your trainer, hitting the gym with a friend, or going for a walk outside. It’s important to get right back into YOUR routine; no excuses! Put those calories to use. Physical activity is your secret weapon.

4. EAT

  • That’s right, EAT! One of the worst things people can do following a Thanksgiving binge is to NOT eat the next day. Your body still needs calories for energy and to function that day. Try eating smaller meals throughout the next few days. Be very mindful of what you eat. Eat your meals when you’re hungry, and continue to drink plenty of fluids. As always, choose foods that are healthy and full of nutrients, such as: whole-grains, quality proteins, colorful fruits and leafy greens.

5. Plan Ahead

  • ‘Fail to plan, plan to fail,’ as the old saying goes. There are many strategies to keep you from overeating: using a smaller plate, drinking water before and after your meal, eating a salad first, eating slowly, etc. Most importantly, however you go about your Thanksgiving meal, make sure you enjoy the foods you look forward to every year, while avoiding other foods you might pick at just because they’re there.
    What about next day leftovers? Keep tempting items out of sight or get them out of the house altogether. Try making a few meals for the day and stick to those. Plan, plan, plan!

Overall, remember to enjoy the holiday season. One bad meal won’t break a healthy lifestyle, just like one healthy meal won’t fix it. So, go ahead; dive into that turkey and stuffing… And, don’t forget to enjoy some desserts, too!

Macronutrients: What, Why, and How?

Macronutrients are the latest craze in the fitness industry. Maybe you’ve been in the gym and have overheard a trainer talking to a client about ‘macros?’ You may have wondered: “What are those?” “Is this for me? “How do I get started?” Well, it’s much simpler than you might think. You’ll only need a food scale and some patience!

So, WHAT Actually Are Macronutrients?

It is widely known that people count calories to lose or gain weight. While that is a very valid tool in reaching health and wellness goals, tracking macronutirents can provide you with much more insight. Macronutrients, or macros for short, are everything we consume on a large scale when it comes to nutrition. This includes: carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Understanding the macros your food consists of can help you pinpoint specific nutrients you may be consuming too much or too little. This can then aide you in setting and achieving your nutrition goals.

As a general rule of thumb:

  • Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram
  • Protein provides 4 calories per gram
  • Fat provides 9 calories per gram

WHY is it Important to Track My Macronutrients?

Everyone is different, and therefore, has different nutritional needs. By calculating your macros, you can see firsthand if you are eating a balanced diet for YOU personally. Tracking your macros, instead of calories, can also help ensure that you continue to eat correctly while achieving your goal of losing, maintaining, or gaining weight.

For example, 100 calories of an avocado (fat) are different from 100 calories of a delicious Krispy Kreme doughnut (carbohydrates). While both have the same number of calories, the 100 calories in an avocado are primarily fat, while the doughnut is made up of mostly carbohydrates. The avocado may also fulfill your entire daily requirement of fat, but the doughnut most likely will not. The avocado provides a much more dynamic amount of vitamins, minerals, and quality calories that your body will use, too, compared to the doughnut. However, when you’re looking at only the calories, they are equal!

Real Life: Calculating Macronutrients

Grab your food scale, and let’s take a look at Quaker oatmeal for a real life example! If you ate one cup of oatmeal and wanted to calculate your macros for that meal, you would first need to determine how many servings you ate. If the serving size is a half-cup, measured dry (40g), you would simply multiply every number on that label by two. So for eating one cup of oatmeal, your macros would be: 54g carbs, 10g protein, and 6g fat for the meal. Now do this for EACH of your meals (or every time you eat) throughout the day. At the end of the day, add up all your macronutrients to visually see your total for the day.

Quaker Oats Macronutrients Calculation ExamplQuaker Oats Nutrition Facts Macronutrients Calculation Example

Macros into Calories

You could also easily take this a step further to determine your overall calories for the day. For reference, scroll back up to the calories per gram of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Multiply each macronutrient total by the number of calories in each unit. That’s it! You now have your total macronutrients for the day, as well as your total calories.

So, if all you ate in a day was oatmeal (side note — we’re not suggesting this!), your total macronutrients for the day, as we calculated above, would be: 54g carbs, 10g protein, and 6g fat. To turn those into calories, take each macronutrient, multiply it by the relevant amount of calories per gram, and add up your totals:

  • Carbohydrates: 54g x 4 cal = 216 calories
  • Protein: 10g x 4 cal = 40 calories
  • Fat: 6g x 9 cal = 54 calories
  • 216 + 40 + 54 = 310 Total Calories

It’s that simple! To help speed up determining your macros in the future, write your meals down on a piece of paper or keep a “food log” for quick reference. Now, next time you eat oatmeal you won’t have to add up your macros!

HOW Do I Determine My Macros?

Your optimal macronutrient intake depends on several different factors including: gender, age, current weight, activity level, lifestyle, diet plan and goals. The college recruit who is trying to add lean muscle, while dropping weight, will be eating according to a different nutritional plan than a retiree now focusing on longevity.

So, where do you start??  Just buy a food scale (Amazon, Target, Walmart) and START! Food scales are relatively inexpensive and are well worth the investment. Before immediately changing your normal routine, eat your regular meals for 1-2 weeks while tracking your numbers. At first, this may seem like a lot of work: writing down meals, calculating numbers, and tracking EVERYTHING. However, the benefits are absolutely superior! Tracking your macros reveals so much. Are you eating too many or too few carbs, protein, or fat? Are your numbers fairly consistent or all over the place? Do you find yourself eating too much in the evenings or eating extremely unhealthy on the weekends? With a little dedication, you’ll be reading labels, learning which foods are high or low in your specific macro areas, and seeing results in no time!

Finally, it is essential to establish some baseline numbers that align with your lifestyle and goals. A good starting point is: 50% carbohydrates, 20% protein, and 30% fat. Do some research online; there are several “macro” calculators that can assist with establishing baseline numbers. MyPlate and MyFitnessPal are also two very useful apps to help track your macros. MyFitnessPal offers a large database of food and lists out the calories, carbs, fats, and proteins to save you calculation time, as well. Search for the food, brand, or restaurant on this page.

Let’s Get Started!

Tracking your macronutrients is important, whether you are on a specific diet or just want to eat well for your overall health. It teaches you if you’re eating too much or too little for your body and how to properly read nutrition labels. Educating yourself on WHAT you are putting into your body is a huge part of maintaining overall wellness. Once you’ve established how much you should eat, counting your macros might be exactly what you need to see the results you want. If you have further questions about macros or exercising, please reach out to us to set up a FREE consultation with one of our Wellness Coordinators!

Safe Squats: Proper Form and Common Mistakes

Buckling Knees

Proper squat form is one of the most popular topics with the popularity of weight lifting. One common mistake when squatting is knee valgus. Knee valgus is when your knees move inward towards midline during functional movements. This usually occurs when your hip adductors (the muscles on the inside of your thighs) overpower your hip abductors (the muscles on the outside of your thighs). Over time, not correcting this mistake could lead to injuries. To correct knee valgus, start with a resistance band above the knees to help give you a tactile cue of pressing out against the band as you are squatting. Your knees should align with the second to third toe during the movement pattern.  Having the band guide your knees outward will help you activate your abductors and lead to better knee alignment in your squats.

Brace Your Core

One of the most important components of a squat is making sure you have properly activated your core. By engaging the core, the spine is braced not allowing for flexion or extension during the movement. Your low back should not round or have an excessive arch. Your hips should flex during a squat without movement at the lumbar spine. Start with unloaded squats to master your pattern. Use a wand or broom stick pressed against your back to see how much your back moves during your squat. The goal is to maintain the same contact and distance with the broom stick throughout the full movement.

Watch Your Neck!

Be mindful of your head and neck position during your squats. Do not lead with the crown of your head! You should not be looking up and have excessive extension through your neck. This is a common mistake that often goes unnoticed. You want to have neutral neck position and keep your eyesight gazing about six to eight feet in front of you. Imagine a dowel running from ear to ear. Do a chin tuck about that axis and maintain that position without moving your head or neck throughout the squat.

Knees Over Toes

A common myth about squatting is “Don’t let your knees go past your toes!” This is a great cue for some people, but remember, everyone’s structure is different. Center mass of load, femur length, shin length, and foot length all play a roll in knee positioning during squatting. If you have long legs and small feet, it would be hard to find a squat position where your knees don’t go over your toes. Hip and knee flexion should happen at a 1:1 ratio during the squatting motion. In short, your knees and hips should both be moving equally and together. The thought is that if we ban our knees going over our toes, then we have reduced the torque on our knees. However, that torque is then translated to the hip joint. Fry, Smith, and Schilling reported in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research that when blocking the knees, we reduce torque by 22% at the knee joint, but increase torque at the hips by 1,070%. We have also changed the angle of the hip joint which increases the moment arm and puts more stress on the lumbar spine. Therefore, the stress you save your knees is multiplied and wreaks havoc on other parts of your body like your hips and back! In summary, sometimes the knees should not track over the toes, but sometimes they should. This cue is not a “one size fits all” cue. An individual’s structure and the type of movement performed dictate knee positioning. There is a place for both methods in training and rehabilitation.

 

New Year, Best You

New Year, Best
You

It’s 2019! With the new year comes new motivation to set and crush your resolutions. One of the most popular resolutions year after year is to get in shape. But did you know almost 80% of people give up on their resolutions by the second week in February? Luckily, Elite’s Wellness Coordinators are here with tools to help keep you on track all throughout 2019!

Goal
Setting

The best way to make sure you don’t get lost in the frenzy
of the new year is to set realistic goals. Setting smaller goals along your way
will help you stay motivated and prevent you from getting burnt out. When
setting these goals remember to stay “SMART”!

Specific:
Your goal should be well-defined and easy to understand.

  • Instead of: “I will be healthy in the New Year”
  • Try: “I will lose weight in the New Year”

Here, you go from a vague and all-encompassing goal to one
that focuses on a specific aspect of being healthy.

Measurable:
Continuing with our example of losing weight, that is still not enough. We must be able to measure and track progress. To
make your goals measurable, try assigning numbers to make sure you can track
your progress!

  • Instead of: “I will be more active in the New
    Year”
  • Try: “I will jog 3 days a week for 30 minutes
    each”

Attainable:
You must have a realistic target goal in mind. It’s great to know how much
weight you want to lose overall, but keep in mind that healthy weight loss
usually means losing between 1-2 lbs. per week. So be careful here! It’s great
to be ambitious, but don’t get extreme. On the other hand, don’t make the goal
so easily attainable that you’re not challenging yourself!

  • Instead of: “I will lose 25 lbs. this month”
  • Try: “I will lose 5 lbs. this month”

Relevant:
Align your goals with where you are in life. Make sure you are setting goals
that are important to you. For example, don’t set a goal to cut out fast food
if you don’t eat it regularly. However, recognizing and eliminating an
unhealthy habit, such as drinking multiple caffeinated beverages in a day, is
more relevant to your daily life.

  • Instead of: “I will cut out fast food”
  • Try: “I will cut out Diet Coke”

Time-bound:
Set a deadline. Having a known end-point can help motivate you to get started.

  • Instead of: “I will lose 20 lbs.”
  • Try: “I will lose 20 lbs. by my birthday”

Now that we understand how to properly set goals, let’s talk
about how to successfully plan for exercise.

Planning for Exercise

In the fitness and wellness world, when talking about exercise
program we refer to FITTE.

Frequency:
If you are just starting out or refocusing, then it is important to determine
how often you plan to exercise. Buy a calendar solely for your workout schedule
and stick to it! Nothing is more satisfying then checking off a completed
workout.

Intensity:
Check your goals and decide how hard you need to work. If you are just starting
out, don’t overdo it. You’ll be able to build intensity over time. If you are
already on a regimen, then maybe it’s time to switch it up and challenge
yourself with a higher intensity.

Time:
How much time each day are you willing to dedicate to exercise? Again, for
beginners you should start slow and build tolerance. Knowing your limits and
respecting them will help prevent you from burning out and throwing in the
towel on your resolution.

Type:
Now it’s time to determine what types of exercise you would like to partake in.
There is no shortage of types to choose from: weightlifting, bodyweight
training, walking, swimming, running, dancing, etc.! Remember to vary your
exercises to avoid overuse injuries and keep yourself interested in your fitness
journey.

Enjoyable: Most
importantly, we come to enjoyable. Make sure to choose exercises that you like.
If you enjoy your workout, then you are more likely to stick to the new plan!

Now that you have these goal setting tools in your toolbox
you’re on your way to having a great new year and being the best version of
yourself! Don’t be afraid to ask for help – we’re here for you! You can always
stop by one of our offices and chat with one of our Wellness Coordinators about
how to further your goals.

Keeping YOU in Yuletide

Can you believe it? We are already in the thick of the holiday season! Right now, everyone is rushing around making sure everything is just perfect for the holidays. In these hectic times, we can lose sight of ourselves and put everyone and everything else first. If you find yourself stressed and busy this holiday season, here are five ways to sneak in some time for yourself and your body.

Start Your Day with Some Stretches

First, make moving a part of your morning routine. Start by contracting and relaxing your muscles from your toes to your head. Scrunch your toes for 5-10 seconds and then relax. Repeat that a couple of times and start working your way up, activating every body part. After that, you can hop out of bed and move through some stretches for each muscle group. If you’re feeling froggy, you can follow a yoga routine. There are some great examples for beginners on Youtube!

Park Farther Away

Next, instead of looking for the closest parking spots, look for one that’s farther away. If you do this on each trip to the store, those steps will definitely add up. Did you know that it is recommended that adults get in 10,000 steps every day? Studies report that only about half of Americans achieve that goal. Parking a few spots farther away will help put a dent on those numbers!

10 and 10

Throughout the day, take a few minutes and do 10 air squats and 10 push-ups. Your goal is five rounds of this a day. After doing 50 squats and 50 push-ups every day, you’ll start to feel changes in no time! Remember for squats, your hips and knees should move at the same time. Don’t stick your rear out too far and don’t come up on your toes allowing your knees to go way past your toes. For push-ups, if you can’t do a full push-up you can always modify to knee push-ups, elevated push-ups on a bench, or even push-ups on the wall.

Walk It Old School

Up next, when given the opportunity to use the elevator or take the stairs…take the stairs. Not only are the stairs typically quicker (no waiting in line or waiting on an elevator car to make it to your floor), but you also add more steps to your daily log. Climbing stairs also creates a physiological response to increase heart rate and speed up your breathing. That means more active time for you!

Stair Master

Speaking of stairs…during those times when you have a few extra minutes on your hands, take a few laps up and down the stairs. There are many advantages to walking flights of stairs. One major advantage is efficiency. While climbing stairs your body burns more calories per minute than jogging! Also, stairs are a free gym. Some people have stairs in their home, but if not, try visiting a local park or mall that’s open for mall-walking in the morning. Finally, making stairs a habit leads to a healthier lifestyle. Studies show a lower mortality rate among people who climb 55 flights of stairs per week. Just think – that’s just under eight flights of stairs a day!

Being more fit and active makes all that holiday shopping and prepping easier, less painful, and with less fatigue. Now you’ve got a plan of attack and more ways to stay active and healthy this holiday season! Now take action, take time for yourself, and take on the season with confidence! If you have pain from the extra standing and walking, you can always schedule a visit with one of our physical therapists. If you’re looking to increase your strength or stamina to make the walking and shopping easier, call us today and set up a FREE consultation with one of our Wellness Coordinators!

 

THE NESS FEST

MARK YOUR CALENDARS… for the premier health and and lifestyle festival of the year!

Elite Integrated Therapy Centers is proud to be a sponsor and presenter at the NESS Fest, coming to Fluor Field in Greenville October 20 & 21, 2018. Join us for the two day community-driven health and lifestyle festival, explore the pillars of wellNESS, goodNESS, fitNESS, and wholeNESS, and experience all that the Upstate has to offer direct from the leaders in our #teamNESS community!

While you’re there, you’ll have two opportunities to see Elite Integrated Therapy Centers take the stage:

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 | 2:15pm | Dry Needling
Paul Hecker, PT, DPT, OCS and co-owner of Elite will be presenting on and demonstrating dry needling therapy. This is a unique technique used to help with back pain, headaches, and other muscle spasms!

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21 | 2:15pm | Fitness & Wellness Demonstration
The team of Certified Personal Trainers from Elite’s Health & Wellness Program will be discussing how they can help people in all stages of their fitness journeys be the best version of themselves!

 

Save 10% on your tickets using our discount code ELITETHERAPY10

Battling Bone Loss: Using Exercise to Combat Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

One of the most widely common problems is also one you might not even know you have – osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition that makes bones weak and brittle because new bone creation does not keep up with old bone removal. This condition that can lead to even more serious problems like falls and broken bones.  Osteoporosis mostly affects women over 41-years old (4). However, exercise is a great way to be proactive! Most of us have heard that weight-bearing exercises are effective in preventing and treating osteoporosis, but have you ever been told why? Luckily, we’re about to tell you! We are going to delve into how and why loading up the body helps rebuild bone structure.

Your Ever-changing Bones

Let’s start by talking about general bone structure. Your body is constantly stripping bone away and replacing it with new bone; similar to your skin sloughing away and regenerating new cells. The problem with osteoporosis comes when your body can’t replace bone at the same pace as it removes bone. In order to initiate new bone growth, stress that is slightly greater than the stress caused from everyday tension must be put on bones. Once this happens on a regular basis, the body allocates resources and nutrients to build bone mass in order to resist fractures (2). A regular exercise routine provides both the necessary stress to the bones and regular occurrence needed for the rebuilding process to occur.

What Kind of Exercise is Best?

Exercise is crucial because physical inactivity has been shown to decrease bone density and cause other health issues. At this point, you may be asking yourself what kind of exercise you should be doing to prevent osteoporosis. While both aerobic exercise and resistance training can provide the weight-bearing stimulation needed for bone growth, resistance training in particular is able to be more site-specific than aerobic exercise and it can target certain body parts (3). Other types of exercise are helpful to prevent osteoporosis, but a progressive loading style resistance program, one in which the weight you are lifting is increased little by little after each set, is best for stressing bones in a way that promotes bone growth.

Exercise Plans

Since we have determined what type of exercise you need to be doing, let us discuss the structure of your exercise program. Exercise structure can be changed up in order to keep things fun. For example, check out the two exercise programs below for simple sit-to-stands below:

Tip: To do a sit-to-stand, set up a chair in your home and stand up and sit down without using your hands

Option 1: [4×12] Routine. T

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 2: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 3: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.

Between rounds, add weight little by little to increase the load.

Option 2: Drop Set [5×12, 10, 8, 6, 4]

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 2: 10 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 3: 8 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 6 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 5: 4 sit-to-stands.

The key to this type of routine is to increase the weight between rounds at a greater rate than in the [4×12] routine. Since you are doing less reps you should increase the load more significantly each set.

Get Moving!

Your choice in movement is also a factor in an effective workout routine. Exercises that involve multi-joint movements have been shown to have a more significant change in bone structure than exercises that isolate one muscle or body part (2). Bending simultaneously at the hip and knee is a good way to encourage bone growth at the hip and femur. Pulling and pushing motions while bracing the core are great ways to incorporate multi-joint movements to increase bone density in the arms, spine, and shoulder structures. For spinal health, isometric (not changing muscle length) core-specific training is key and make sure to avoid core movements that require forward bending, like crunches (1).

Now that we’ve covered designing your structured movement plan, you are ready to prevent or reverse osteoporosis! These adaptations generally take about six months to see a change in bone density, but the change is initiated within the first few sessions (2). Be patient and don’t get discouraged! Come in and see one of our physical therapists for an evaluation and to talk about some more ways to safely strengthen your bones to prevent falls and increase bone density. Keep working hard and graduate to work with one of our Wellness Coordinators and progress your movements to the next level!

 

  • Bone, Muscle and Joint Team. “The Best Workouts for Osteoporosis.” Health Essentials, 2018, health.clevelandclinic.org/the-best-workouts-for-osteoporosis/.
  • French, Duncan. “Chapter 5: Adaptations to Anaerobic Training Programs.” Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, by Greg Haff and N. Travis Triplett, Human Kinetics, 2016, pp. 97–99.
  • Layne, JE, and ME Nelson. The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Bone Density: a Review.1999, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006.
  • Mayo Clinic Staff. “Osteoporosis.” Mayo Clinic, 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20351968.

 

Game On!

School is back in session, which means our favorite sports are back too! Unfortunately, this means an increase in sports-related injuries. It’s estimated that high school sports are responsible for 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations every year. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, nearly 3 million children under age 14 are hurt each year playing sports, 25 percent of them so seriously they require a trip to the emergency room.

Keeping this in mind, it’s important to recognize common sports-related injuries and their warning signs in order to lessen the impact of the injury and keep your athletes safe throughout the season.

SPRAIN OR STRAIN
Sprain or strain to a muscle or joint are the most common sport related injury. This type of injury can occur in just about any part of the body, although sprained ankles are the most common. Research has shown that early recognition and treatment of a sprain or strain will help speed your recovery, so schedule an appointment with a doctor or physical therapist as soon as possible. In the meantime, remember the R.I.C.E method… Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation… to reduce pain and swelling.

ACL TEAR
An ACL tear is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. The ACL is the most commonly injured ligament in the knee, which affects an athlete’s ability to make the sudden or explosive movements required in sports like football, soccer, basketball and cheerleading. This can be a season or career ending injury.

CONCUSSIONS
Usually caused by a blow to the head, concussions don’t always involve a loss of consciousness. In fact, most people who have concussions never black out. Many athletes don’t report or are unaware that they have a concussion. Here are some of the warning signs to help you identify if your athlete has sustained a concussion:

  Loss of Consciousness (seen in less than 10 % of concussions)
  Forgets events prior to the injury (retrograde amnesia)
•  Forgets events after the injury (anterograde amnesia)
•  Appears to be dazed or stunned
•  Is confused
  Forgets plays
•  Is unsure of score or opponent
•  Moves clumsily
•  Seems off balance
•  Shows behavior or personality change
•  May repeat themselves
•  Vomiting

Talk to one of the skilled clinicians at Elite Integrated Therapy Centers today about how to protect your athlete from sports-related injuries. All locations have extended hours to accommodate school and practice schedules!

4th of July Workout

Did you kickstart your 4th with fireworks? Kickstart your day off with this 7-4-2018 workout! Pick seven exercises (Month), with four rounds (day of the week), at 20 reps for rounds one and three and 18 reps for rounds two and four (year). Sometimes it can be hard to motivate yourself during the holidays, so performing a HIIT (High-Intensity Interval Training) workout can be something short and simple to start with. A HIIT workout is a cardiovascular exercise focusing on short, but intense, bursts of exercise that typically last 30 min or less. To help you get started here are seven body weight exercises:

  • Squat Jumps: Start in the squat position with feet shoulder width apart and explode up. You want to land softly and absorb the jump going back down into a squat.
  • Side Planks: Start on either your left or right side with your body inline from your shoulders to your feet. Your elbow should be placed under the shoulder with your weight distributed through the forearm. Then lifting your hips off the ground maintaining a straight line.
  • High Knees: Stand in place with feet hip width apart. Then alternate bringing each knee up as high and fast as you can, while maintaining a tight core.
  • Push Ups: Hands should be placed slightly wider than your shoulders with your shoulders between 45-degrees to 60-degrees. Push up while maintaining a tight core.
  • Alternating Lunges: With upper body straight and core engaged, step forward with one foot and lower hips until both knees are at a 90-degree angle. Be sure to not let your back knee touch the floor and your front knee is above the ankle.
  • Superman’s: Lie face down with arms straight in front of you. Then raise arms, chest, and legs off of the floor. Use the muscles in your back and bum to make this happen.
  • Burpees: Start the in the squat position leading into placing your hands on the ground outside of the feet. You will then jump both feet back ending in a plank position. Once in the plank position perform a push-up, then in the up position bring both feet back underneath the hands and jump up as high as possible.

Go through all seven exercises with little rest between each exercise and then rest 2-3 mins between each round.