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All Hands on Deck!

Have you heard the phrase “manual therapy”? No, it doesn’t mean we’re going step-by-step through a handbook or manual during your physical therapy sessions…. Manual therapy is the assessment and treatment of neurological, cardio-respiratory, and orthopedic problems through hands-on interventions. A skilled manual therapist is able to evaluate and address diagnoses by rolling up their sleeves and feeling their way through treatment. The objective of manual therapy is to treat the neuro-orthopedic component of any disorder by focusing on the cause of disease or condition itself. The treatment can utilize massage, myofascial release, soft tissue mobilization, joint and nerve mobilization, joint manipulation, and muscle energy techniques.

 

Benefits of manual therapy include:

  • Effective for acute and chronic pain
  • Helpful in relaxing muscles and breaking up scar tissue
  • Useful in increasing joint movement beyond restricted range of motion
  • Helpful in reducing painful muscle spasms

 

SMARTY PANTS

Seven of our physical therapists at Elite are actively completing coursework and education hours to obtain their FAAOMPT (Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy). This is the highest form of education for physical therapists, and currently, there are only 22 registered Fellows in the state of South Carolina.

 

While manual therapy is a great resource to utilize during treatment sessions, that’s not all we put to action. We may also incorporate a variety of exercises, equipment based therapy (such as dry needling or electronic stimulation), and ultrasound. Each patient is different, so we’re sure to complete a full assessment before launching a course of treatment to make sure your plan is individualized to you!

Your Wait Time Will Be…

From two day shipping to grocery concierge services to being able to know in real time which traffic route is the fastest just by pulling up an app on your phone—we live in a day and age of instant gratification and convenience. Wouldn’t it be nice if healthcare worked the same way? What if, at the onset of pain, injury, or physical inconvenience, you were able to contact your healthcare provider and be seen within a week? a couple of days? a matter of a few hours? As evidenced by the growing number of urgent care facilities in the Upstate, there’s certainly a need that’s being addressed in the community. However, when you’re in need of a specialist, the process can become lengthy and in some cases, your health care should not be put on hold.

Fortunately, the state of South Carolina recognizes this sense of urgency and has Direct Access regulations in place that allow you to be seen by a physical therapist for up to 30 days, no referral needed! At Elite Integrated Therapy Centers, we make it our mission to accommodate you within 24-48 hours. During your first visit, we will evaluate the issue and create a plan to treat the root cause of the problem, not just the symptoms. On the back end, we will loop in your primary care physician to keep things on pace, just in case we anticipate going over that 30 day mark. Physical therapy is a great option to not only address your issues quickly, but is also cost effective in the long run. For example, a recent study found seeing a physical therapist within 14 days of onset of pain can minimize health care costs by 50%!

Curious as to what physical therapy can treat? While physical therapy is commonly thought of for back pain or athletic injuries, it can address so much more: muscle pain, joint pain, vertigo, TMJ/lock jaw, pre- & post-surgery, pain pre- & post-pregnancy, and incontinence, to name a few. Why put your healthcare on hold? Call today to speak with one of our team members at Elite Integrated Therapy Centers!

THE NESS FEST

MARK YOUR CALENDARS… for the premier health and and lifestyle festival of the year!

Elite Integrated Therapy Centers is proud to be a sponsor and presenter at the NESS Fest, coming to Fluor Field in Greenville October 20 & 21, 2018. Join us for the two day community-driven health and lifestyle festival, explore the pillars of wellNESS, goodNESS, fitNESS, and wholeNESS, and experience all that the Upstate has to offer direct from the leaders in our #teamNESS community!

While you’re there, you’ll have two opportunities to see Elite Integrated Therapy Centers take the stage:

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 | 2:15pm | Dry Needling
Paul Hecker, PT, DPT, OCS and co-owner of Elite will be presenting on and demonstrating dry needling therapy. This is a unique technique used to help with back pain, headaches, and other muscle spasms!

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21 | 2:15pm | Fitness & Wellness Demonstration
The team of Certified Personal Trainers from Elite’s Health & Wellness Program will be discussing how they can help people in all stages of their fitness journeys be the best version of themselves!

 

Save 10% on your tickets using our discount code ELITETHERAPY10

Battling Bone Loss: Using Exercise to Combat Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

One of the most widely common problems is also one you might not even know you have – osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition that makes bones weak and brittle because new bone creation does not keep up with old bone removal. This condition that can lead to even more serious problems like falls and broken bones.  Osteoporosis mostly affects women over 41-years old (4). However, exercise is a great way to be proactive! Most of us have heard that weight-bearing exercises are effective in preventing and treating osteoporosis, but have you ever been told why? Luckily, we’re about to tell you! We are going to delve into how and why loading up the body helps rebuild bone structure.

Your Ever-changing Bones

Let’s start by talking about general bone structure. Your body is constantly stripping bone away and replacing it with new bone; similar to your skin sloughing away and regenerating new cells. The problem with osteoporosis comes when your body can’t replace bone at the same pace as it removes bone. In order to initiate new bone growth, stress that is slightly greater than the stress caused from everyday tension must be put on bones. Once this happens on a regular basis, the body allocates resources and nutrients to build bone mass in order to resist fractures (2). A regular exercise routine provides both the necessary stress to the bones and regular occurrence needed for the rebuilding process to occur.

What Kind of Exercise is Best?

Exercise is crucial because physical inactivity has been shown to decrease bone density and cause other health issues. At this point, you may be asking yourself what kind of exercise you should be doing to prevent osteoporosis. While both aerobic exercise and resistance training can provide the weight-bearing stimulation needed for bone growth, resistance training in particular is able to be more site-specific than aerobic exercise and it can target certain body parts (3). Other types of exercise are helpful to prevent osteoporosis, but a progressive loading style resistance program, one in which the weight you are lifting is increased little by little after each set, is best for stressing bones in a way that promotes bone growth.

Exercise Plans

Since we have determined what type of exercise you need to be doing, let us discuss the structure of your exercise program. Exercise structure can be changed up in order to keep things fun. For example, check out the two exercise programs below for simple sit-to-stands below:

Tip: To do a sit-to-stand, set up a chair in your home and stand up and sit down without using your hands

Option 1: [4×12] Routine. T

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 2: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 3: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest.

Between rounds, add weight little by little to increase the load.

Option 2: Drop Set [5×12, 10, 8, 6, 4]

  • Round 1: 12 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 2: 10 sit-to-stands. Rest
  • Round 3: 8 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 4: 6 sit-to-stands. Rest.
  • Round 5: 4 sit-to-stands.

The key to this type of routine is to increase the weight between rounds at a greater rate than in the [4×12] routine. Since you are doing less reps you should increase the load more significantly each set.

Get Moving!

Your choice in movement is also a factor in an effective workout routine. Exercises that involve multi-joint movements have been shown to have a more significant change in bone structure than exercises that isolate one muscle or body part (2). Bending simultaneously at the hip and knee is a good way to encourage bone growth at the hip and femur. Pulling and pushing motions while bracing the core are great ways to incorporate multi-joint movements to increase bone density in the arms, spine, and shoulder structures. For spinal health, isometric (not changing muscle length) core-specific training is key and make sure to avoid core movements that require forward bending, like crunches (1).

Now that we’ve covered designing your structured movement plan, you are ready to prevent or reverse osteoporosis! These adaptations generally take about six months to see a change in bone density, but the change is initiated within the first few sessions (2). Be patient and don’t get discouraged! Come in and see one of our physical therapists for an evaluation and to talk about some more ways to safely strengthen your bones to prevent falls and increase bone density. Keep working hard and graduate to work with one of our Wellness Coordinators and progress your movements to the next level!

 

  • Bone, Muscle and Joint Team. “The Best Workouts for Osteoporosis.” Health Essentials, 2018, health.clevelandclinic.org/the-best-workouts-for-osteoporosis/.
  • French, Duncan. “Chapter 5: Adaptations to Anaerobic Training Programs.” Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning, by Greg Haff and N. Travis Triplett, Human Kinetics, 2016, pp. 97–99.
  • Layne, JE, and ME Nelson. The Effects of Progressive Resistance Training on Bone Density: a Review.1999, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006.
  • Mayo Clinic Staff. “Osteoporosis.” Mayo Clinic, 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20351968.

 

Game On!

School is back in session, which means our favorite sports are back too! Unfortunately, this means an increase in sports-related injuries. It’s estimated that high school sports are responsible for 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations every year. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, nearly 3 million children under age 14 are hurt each year playing sports, 25 percent of them so seriously they require a trip to the emergency room.

Keeping this in mind, it’s important to recognize common sports-related injuries and their warning signs in order to lessen the impact of the injury and keep your athletes safe throughout the season.

SPRAIN OR STRAIN
Sprain or strain to a muscle or joint are the most common sport related injury. This type of injury can occur in just about any part of the body, although sprained ankles are the most common. Research has shown that early recognition and treatment of a sprain or strain will help speed your recovery, so schedule an appointment with a doctor or physical therapist as soon as possible. In the meantime, remember the R.I.C.E method… Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation… to reduce pain and swelling.

ACL TEAR
An ACL tear is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. The ACL is the most commonly injured ligament in the knee, which affects an athlete’s ability to make the sudden or explosive movements required in sports like football, soccer, basketball and cheerleading. This can be a season or career ending injury.

CONCUSSIONS
Usually caused by a blow to the head, concussions don’t always involve a loss of consciousness. In fact, most people who have concussions never black out. Many athletes don’t report or are unaware that they have a concussion. Here are some of the warning signs to help you identify if your athlete has sustained a concussion:

  Loss of Consciousness (seen in less than 10 % of concussions)
  Forgets events prior to the injury (retrograde amnesia)
•  Forgets events after the injury (anterograde amnesia)
•  Appears to be dazed or stunned
•  Is confused
  Forgets plays
•  Is unsure of score or opponent
•  Moves clumsily
•  Seems off balance
•  Shows behavior or personality change
•  May repeat themselves
•  Vomiting

Talk to one of the skilled clinicians at Elite Integrated Therapy Centers today about how to protect your athlete from sports-related injuries. All locations have extended hours to accommodate school and practice schedules!